United Methodist Church News Feed

Small business loans empower Malawi women
Through small business loans, Mercy Chikhosi believes in empowering women to support their families and communities.
Way Forward gets input on church future
The commission asked various United Methodists to describe their preferences regarding the extent of the inclusion of LGBTQ people within the church.
Yellowstone Conference facing financial crisis
Yellowstone’s financial problems are similar to those facing the rest of the church and having a “gay bishop is only one of many factors,” officials said.
Roots of Faith in Korea: A United Methodist Bishop’s Journey
Bishop Hee-Soo Jung grew up on a small island with a view of North Korea. He credits U.S. missionaries and a kind neighbor for his conversion to Christianity.
Albanian church holds national convention
The United Methodist Church in Albania holds national convention and first worship at the first United Methodist church in Durrës.
Assisting those fleeing siege in Philippines
United Methodists are reaching out to civilians caught in battle with Islamic State militants in Marawi City, Philippines.
Duke Divinity School striving for diversity
Dean says diversity and equity are top priorities for faculty and student body.
Profiles of student diversity at Duke
Forty-seven denominations are represented at United Methodist Duke Divinity School. Total enrollment in all degree programs is 631.
Becoming fishers of young men
United Methodist Men during their national gathering heard ideas on where to cast their nets to draw in millennial disciples.
Inmates learn to grow food
Seventeen inmates from a prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, graduated from a one-year horticultural course offered with United Methodist help.

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Spiritual Longing on the Silver Screen

How the makers (and watchers) of movies are engaged in a kind of prayer.

We had been married only a month the first time I showed my wife Vertigo, Alfred Hitchcock’s psycho-drama about a man so obsessed with a dead woman that he remakes another woman in the dead woman’s image. This was perhaps the wrong film to show my new bride. “That’s one of your favorite movies?” she asked as the movie ended. “That’s very disturbing.” I figured she was talking about the movie itself—which is disturbing—but she might also have been thinking of my esteem for it.

I had loved Vertigo since I first saw it at age 11. My parents, huge Hitchcock fans, showed it to me and my siblings one Sunday afternoon after church. Though I had watched it many times since then, I had never given much thought to why I liked it. Marriage has a way of prompting you to reconsider things you once took for granted.

Over the next two years, I continued watching Vertigo regularly. I read every bit of critical scholarship I could find. I used all my powers as a film scholar to better understand how it works. I appealed to my seminary training to plumb my own heart and fathom why it makes such an impression on me.

What I discovered about myself is complicated. But what I discovered about Vertigo I can state simply: Vertigo is a film about a man’s obsession with achieving his ideal and his willingness to take advantage of others to achieve it. It is also—thanks to its clever twist and Kim Novak’s pathos-filled performance—a film about how, in pursuing our ideals, we allow others to take advantage of us. Vertigo is about the horrors wrought by selfishness on the individual and the community. It is disturbing because it is so candid about how selfish we can be. ...

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The Rise of the Nons: Protestants Keep Ditching Denominations

Nondenominational identity has doubled in the US since 2000, Gallup finds.

Ask an American Christian what type of church they belong to, and you’re more likely than ever to hear the label nondenominational.

The proportion of Protestants in the United States who don’t identify with a specific denomination doubled between 2000 and 2016, according to a Gallup poll released this week. Now, about 1 in 6 Americans are nondenominational Christians.

The growing popularity of nondenominational identity is the result of two trends: the decline in the number of Protestants overall, as more Americans eschew any religious affiliation (becoming “the nones”), and shrinking denominations themselves.

Not only are the major mainline churches continuing to see their numbers fall, the country’s largest Protestant denomination—the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC)—has lost a million members in the past 15 years.

Prior to 2000, half of all Americans belonged to a specific Protestant denomination. Now, just 30 percent do, Gallup reported.

“Churches that adhere to specific and historical denominational affiliations appear to face the biggest challenge in American Protestantism today,” the pollster wrote. “Increasingly, Christian Americans … prefer to either identify themselves simply as Christians or attend the increasing number of nondenominational churches that have no formal allegiance to a broader religious structure.”

Back in 2010, the Hartford Institute for Religion Research tallied more than 35,000 nondenominational churches in the US, comprising more than 12 million attendees. The move away from historic denominations corresponds with a swelling sense of skepticism many Americans have toward institutions overall.

The shift toward nondenominational ...

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A Kairos Moment for Small Town America

Over 30 million people still live in rural areas.

When is time more than just seconds and minutes stuck end-to-end? If you’ve been around the Church for a while, you probably know the answer. As the Greeks and the authors of the Greek New Testament knew, there is time (chronos), and then there is time (kairos). The first gives us our English word chronology and basically describes the time we chart with clocks and calendars. Kairos time, on the other hand, carries the implication of time “especially fit for something.”

When it comes to rural ministry and small town church planting, we are living in a kairos moment that we in the Vineyard—and we as Christians in America—too often neglect at our own peril.

Regardless of what one thinks about our last presidential election cycle, virtually everyone admits that it illuminates a deeply polarized society. Geography stood as one of the most notable indicators of this divide. In the gear up for election day, it became increasingly obvious that rural and small town folks were residents of what Tish Harrison Warren had the courage to describe, in an August 2016 Christianity Today article, as “The America I Forgot.” Indeed, as commentators across the country demonstrated by their extreme confusion on election night, it was an America many people, from journalists to pollsters, seemed to have forgotten.

Trump’s victory further catalyzed a growing fascination among America’s urban elite (and not-so-elite) with an entire segment of America that they had never taken very seriously. Books like Robert Putnam’s Our Kids (2015) and J.D. Vance’s bestselling memoir Hillbilly Elegy (2016) became essential tour guides to a culture just as foreign to many Americans as another country. ...

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